WelcomeTree Farm Vision

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“Odd as I am sure it will appear to some, I can think of no better form of personal involvement in the cure of the environment than that of gardening. A person who is growing a garden, if he is growing it organically, is improving a piece of the world. He is producing something to eat, which makes him somewhat independent of the grocery business, but he is also enlarging, for himself, the meaning of food and the pleasure of eating.”
Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays

Our vision at WelcomeTree Farm is to better the health and happiness of our community and the world as a whole:

* Inspiring personal health, deeper compassion, and environmental mindfulness through organic gardening, whole food plant-based diet, meaningful movement, meditation and a connection with animals and nature.

* Teaching about the benefits of growing an organic garden and being an organic consumer (Our health, healing & preserving our environment, a sense of purpose, spiritual well being, education of a new generation, and our interconnections with all living things…).

* Sharing our passion for ending the destructive forces of factory farming through hands-on educational activities and lectures that cultivate a deeper compassion for all sentient beings. (I plan to visit Farm Sanctuary in Watkin Glen, NY in 2019 to learn more about how we can support the mission to end factory farming).

* Supporting low-income and elderly community members in establishing their own organic gardens (Individuals or families would be supplied with low or no-cost organic vegetable seedlings, tilling or raised-bed construction, and “as-needed” levels of support with planting, weeding, harvesting, and recipe/cooking support).

* Selling, sharing, and donating organic vegetables and fruit to the community that we live in. 

* Actively engaging in our local and government politics to help ensure:

1) The integrity of organic farming.

2) Support of diversified, sustainable farm practices that protect people, animals, and soil health.

3) The right to know what is in our food.

4) Food, shelter and health justice, where food free from pesticides and human/animal abuse, a place to call home, and health care are treated as the basic human rights that they should be.

Would you like to support the WelcomeTree Farm vision? Just click the Donate Button at the top of the page. We will let you know exactly how your contribution helped to further our goals. Please pass along our website to your friends and family. Thank you.

Any questions? Contact Denise at welcometreefarm@me.com.

Living Wabi Sabi

It is not despite our problems, but because of them that our hearts hold everything we need to be joyful.” Taro Gold

iphone fencev 040 I am going to begin with some honesty today: Our barn is really not a barn. It is only a corn crib disguised as a barn.

After spending sometime with the goats and chickens yesterday, I began feeling like a disgruntled corn crib owner. All I could see were all of the problems, and began picturing everyone else’s perfect barns.  I don’t really know who these perfect barn owners are, but I know their barns are better than mine. My thoughts quickly spiraled off into images of Animal Welfare folks coming down the driveway with their take-em-away truck because they had gotten wind of the goat turds that are intermittently found floating in water buckets and hiding in baking soda dispensers.

I suppose it could be all of those farm magazines I read… If someone was coming to my house to write a story about my farm,  I guess I would scrub that sucker down too, put diapers on all of the chickens and goats, and maybe replace the chicken feed bags that keep the wind out with a real tarp. My barn would probably look pretty darn good, in kind of an Ozarks- hillbilly sort of way.

Now, let’s rewind things a bit, to an important memory.

I could barely take it all in when my daughters and I drove up the long driveway to the old farmhouse on 1500 acres of land, and there it was… the little red barn within walking distance of the house. At the time, I knew nothing about corn cribs, so it was a barn to me. We looked at the house and I was giddy, but not as giddy as when the gentleman told me that the corn crib was apart of the agreement. He slid open the heavy old door and I could do nothing but grin. It was a real old barn with its rafters full of spider webs and the sun shining and wind blowing through the broken panes of glass of the four square windows. My senses overloaded with joy. It’s almost like I could see the chickens roosting in the rafters and the goats bedded down together in the golden straw. It was perfectly imperfect.

This memory began flickering as I was contemplating my barn dilemma at the kitchen table. At that same moment, the mailman drove up our driveway, and hopped out with a package. In that package was a book from a friend titled, Living Wabi Sabi by Taro Gold. There sat in front of me a book about an ancient Japanese Buddhist philosophy centering around “…the oddities, the perfectly imperfect uniqueness of you and me and everything…the value of objects, events, and the entirety of life “as is” unpolished, unpredictable, and natural.” It is a book about the empowerment of imperfection.

The book begins with the author’s grandma telling him, ” You will grow to be even happier than you can possibly imagine today.” She was right. After reading the book that same morning, I felt tremendous joy about who I am and the life that I am living.

There is so much beauty in everything that is imperfect, including you and me. The broken window at the peak of barn is like my anxiety, or the open slats that have to be covered to keep the wind out are like my imperfect body, or the never-ending shit that is everywhere, and I mean everywhere (please be careful  where you put your hand) is like the poo of life that just won’t go away no matter how much you try to scrub it. Scrape away one giant pile of frozen shit one day, undoubtedly there will be a new one soon there after.

I guess the more I love and accept my Wabi Sabi corn crib, the more I can love my Wabi Sabi self.

I am including a video of a group of people in Paraguay, South America that seems to embody the Wabi Sabi philosophy. It’s so beautifully imperfect.

A Woman that Inspires Me

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“As  a single footstep will not make a path on the earth, so a single thought will not make a pathway in the mind. To make a deep physical path, we walk again and  again. To make a deep mental path, we must think over and over the kind of  thoughts we wish to dominate our lives.” Henry David Thoreau

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This blog entry is dedicated to my cousin Jennifer. We grew up together, seeing each other at birthdays, Christmas and other family events and then she went away. I did not understand much about why she no longer came to our family gatherings, but I missed her very much. What I did know was that she was in some kind of trouble. Jennifer recently spoke out publicly about how she was stolen as a young girl from all of us, and herself, into the world of human sex trafficking. She has been on my mind a great deal lately, after connecting with her on Facebook. I see her pictures and the words she writes, and all I feel is grateful that she is alive and taking back her life.

I sat looking at our freshly tilled garden this past week and realized it was like an empty canvas. There it waits, ready to be transformed.

Last year was our first year growing a garden in Illinois. We were horribly unprepared, and behind in our growing schedule. The garden was full of weeds because we did not own a tiller. We rented one for a couple of days, which was not near enough time to finish the job properly. The tomatoes were up front, along with the herbs, and peppers. The sides of the garden were lined with giant sunflowers and zucchini while the back-end held the gourds, potatoes, beans and cucumbers. The weeds bothered me at first, but I made the decision early on to focus on the garden’s beauty and abundance.

The longer I sat near the barn, thinking about last year’s efforts and staring off at the garden, I began to see something else. The garden quite resembled the human spirit, and its amazing ability to bounce back and inspire. Just like each of us, the earth remembers the challenges, mistakes, abuses, and sorrow, but it can be re-claimed and nourished back to health. Each year, the garden only grows stronger through change and learning from the previous year’s joys and mistakes.

Our newly tilled garden made me think of my cousin Jennifer. I wish that I would have asked more questions and reached out to her years ago. This year my garden is in honor of her and her beautiful and resilient spirit. Jenny…you are so very loved.

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